Insight Landscape

The leading edge of insight creation.

Monthly Archive: October 2013

Monday

28

October 2013

0

COMMENTS

Report from the PMRG Institute 2012

Written by , Posted in Industry Reflections

PMRG (the Pharmaceutical Marketing Research Group) held the second annual iteration of the PMRG Institute in Philadelphia recently.  The Institute is one of two major events that PMRG hosts each year (the other being the Annual National Conference in the spring).  The PMRG Institute provides a forum for sharing best practices in healthcare market research. This year a poster session was added, expanding the opportunities for researchers to share, among other things, some new ways of tackling old problems.

(more…)

Monday

28

October 2013

0

COMMENTS

Using “Research on Research” to Improve Market Research Survey Design

Written by , Posted in Research Methods

Market researchers rely on a variety of ways of obtaining information from respondents who complete online surveys. Some survey methodologies are very similar to each other, attempting to collect the information in different ways. Recently we evaluated two methods of ranking attributes: the drag and drop method compared to numeric entry. We investigated two aspects of each of these: Did these methods provide us with different results? Is one method more appealing to respondents compared with the other? We sought to understand whether one of these methods was better than the other as way to increase respondent satisfaction (and thus future response rates) without a change in the end-result of the data. (more…)

Monday

28

October 2013

0

COMMENTS

Monday

28

October 2013

0

COMMENTS

Which variety of conjoint should I use?

Written by , Posted in Optimizing Insight, Research Methods

Conjoint analysis, one of the most effective tools for understanding buyer decision making, was first introduced in the early 1980’s in the form of a card sorting task. The typical task consisted of 18 or more physical cards, each bearing a product description that was constructed by combining features according to experimental design principles, and respondents sorted the cards in rank order from most preferred to least preferred. Monotonic analysis of variance (“MONANOVA”) was used to estimate “part-worths” for each of the features that made up the product concepts. Once the researcher had these part-worths in hand it was possible to simulate the choices consumers would make under different competitive market scenarios. (more…)