Insight Landscape

The leading edge of insight creation.

Author Archive

Thursday

6

February 2014

0

COMMENTS

Does “traditional” market research have a role in the future of insight creation?

Written by , Posted in Business Insights, Industry Reflections, Market Reseach

Greenbook has just released the latest version of its Research Industry Trends (GRIT 14) survey of market research buyers and sellers.  Among other findings, the report reveals trends in client organizations’ use of “new” research technologies such as online communities (down), mobile surveys (down), social media analytics (up), text analytics (flat), and big data analytics (up). The technologies that are trending up have one thing in common:  they do not require direct active interrogation of consumers.  Almost all of our “traditional” market research techniques, on the other hand, require some kind of dialogue with the consumer, whether or not it takes place in real time. (more…)

Thursday

23

January 2014

0

COMMENTS

Design thinking leads to smarter market insights

Written by , Posted in Business Insights, Industry Reflections, Optimizing Insight

In case you haven’t noticed, there’s an emerging—and growing—interest among leading management gurus in something called “design thinking.”  The origins of design thinking can be found in the industrial design world.  DT’s roots go back to the 1970’s and something called “participatory design” that brought actual users into the design process, asking them to test prototypes and provide feedback.  A decade later “participatory” had evolved into “user-centered” and user (or customer) “needs” became the focal point of the design process.  (more…)

Friday

3

January 2014

0

COMMENTS

From Market Researcher to “Insight Scientist”

Written by , Posted in Business Insights, Insight Infrastructure, Market Reseach

In an article in the October, 2012 issue of Harvard Business Review, Thomas H. Davenport and D.J. Patil proclaim that “data scientist” is “the sexiest job of the 21st century.”  There’s no doubt that data scientists are in demand as the digital trails we generate grow exponentially (in just the last few months I’ve added Instagram, Snapchat and a second Twitter account).   “Big data” places a high premium on the ability to write code for algorithms that will clean, transform, and beat these new (and often unstructured) data streams into submission and they yield up their secrets. (more…)

Tuesday

17

December 2013

0

COMMENTS

What’s Your Value Prop? Using customer insight to guide product and service development.

Written by , Posted in Business Insights, Market Reseach

If you’ve seen “This is Spinal Tap,” you no doubt remember the scene where Nigel Tufnel (Christopher Guest) points out that the volume controls on his guitar amplifier “go up to 11” while all other bands’ amps go just to ten.  When Marty diBergi (Rob Reiner), the director of the movie within the movie, asks why they don’t just make the “10” louder, Nigel, somewhat confused, replies “These go to eleven.”  (more…)

Tuesday

3

December 2013

0

COMMENTS

Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places: How to Uncover Unmet Customer Needs

Written by , Posted in Business Insights, Market Reseach, Optimizing Insight

Most research briefs that come our way these days have somewhere in the stated objectives, “uncover unmet needs,” either as the focal point of the research or an add-on to other central objectives.  For decades, entrepreneurs, marketers, and philanthropists have followed this one piece of advice for achieving success:  find a need and fill it.  Startup companies often emerge from an entrepreneur’s struggle to solve a specific problem.  When the solution is found, a company is born to bring that solution to others with the same problem. (more…)

Monday

18

November 2013

0

COMMENTS

Big Data—the Insight Engine of the Future?

Written by , Posted in Business Insights, Market Reseach

It seems that you cannot open a business-focused magazine these days without bumping into the claim that big data will forever change the way we do business, including the way we understand customers.  But like many of the things we have heard over the last couple of decades about the impact of digitizing everything under the sun, there is both more and less to the claims being made for big data.

(more…)

Monday

28

October 2013

0

COMMENTS

Report from the PMRG Institute 2012

Written by , Posted in Industry Reflections

PMRG (the Pharmaceutical Marketing Research Group) held the second annual iteration of the PMRG Institute in Philadelphia recently.  The Institute is one of two major events that PMRG hosts each year (the other being the Annual National Conference in the spring).  The PMRG Institute provides a forum for sharing best practices in healthcare market research. This year a poster session was added, expanding the opportunities for researchers to share, among other things, some new ways of tackling old problems.

(more…)

Monday

28

October 2013

0

COMMENTS

Using “Research on Research” to Improve Market Research Survey Design

Written by , Posted in Research Methods

Market researchers rely on a variety of ways of obtaining information from respondents who complete online surveys. Some survey methodologies are very similar to each other, attempting to collect the information in different ways. Recently we evaluated two methods of ranking attributes: the drag and drop method compared to numeric entry. We investigated two aspects of each of these: Did these methods provide us with different results? Is one method more appealing to respondents compared with the other? We sought to understand whether one of these methods was better than the other as way to increase respondent satisfaction (and thus future response rates) without a change in the end-result of the data. (more…)

Monday

28

October 2013

0

COMMENTS

Monday

28

October 2013

0

COMMENTS

Which variety of conjoint should I use?

Written by , Posted in Optimizing Insight, Research Methods

Conjoint analysis, one of the most effective tools for understanding buyer decision making, was first introduced in the early 1980’s in the form of a card sorting task. The typical task consisted of 18 or more physical cards, each bearing a product description that was constructed by combining features according to experimental design principles, and respondents sorted the cards in rank order from most preferred to least preferred. Monotonic analysis of variance (“MONANOVA”) was used to estimate “part-worths” for each of the features that made up the product concepts. Once the researcher had these part-worths in hand it was possible to simulate the choices consumers would make under different competitive market scenarios. (more…)