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Research Methods Archive

Monday

30

June 2014

0

COMMENTS

Report from the MR Innovation Frontlines: IIeX North America

Written by , Posted in Conferences and Publications, Market Reseach, Research Methods

Insight Innovation Exchange North America 2014 took place in Atlanta June 16 through June 18.  This was one in a series of iiex events that are being presented around the world by Greenbook and Gen2 Advisors.  So far this year there have been events in Amsterdam and Santiago and one is scheduled for Sydney in December.

As market research conferences go, iiex-na was impressive.  There were about 650 attendees and a packed three-day schedule with well over 100 different individual speakers and panelists. Most presentations were limited to 20-minute time slots, encouraging a TED-like exchange of ideas (of course, market researchers being market researchers, not all presenters have mastered that format). (more…)

Friday

14

February 2014

0

COMMENTS

Think like a Respondent to Improve Survey Data Quality

Written by , Posted in Market Reseach, Optimizing Insight, Research Methods

Most likely you rely at least to some extent on survey data to divine the insights that lead to better business decisions.  How confident are you that your survey data are both reliable and valid?

We’ve come a long way in the practice of survey research in terms of understanding and managing sources of error such as scale usage bias and order effects, but an accumulation of research into the unobservable cognitive processes that come into play when respondents answer survey questions shows that crafting survey questions that reliably elicit the information we think we are asking for is no easy matter.  In fact, the survey question may be the weakest link in the chain of components that comprise the typical quantitative market research study. (more…)

Monday

25

November 2013

0

COMMENTS

Realizing the Value of Mixed Respondent Mini-Groups

Written by , Posted in Research Methods

Early in my career I was told that mixing physician types and other medical professionals in group interview settings was a no-no.  The main concerns surround the potential biasing influence of dominant personalities, the influence of role relationships outside of the group, and the possibility that respondent worries about appearances or reputation will stifle open conversation. (more…)

Monday

28

October 2013

0

COMMENTS

Using “Research on Research” to Improve Market Research Survey Design

Written by , Posted in Research Methods

Market researchers rely on a variety of ways of obtaining information from respondents who complete online surveys. Some survey methodologies are very similar to each other, attempting to collect the information in different ways. Recently we evaluated two methods of ranking attributes: the drag and drop method compared to numeric entry. We investigated two aspects of each of these: Did these methods provide us with different results? Is one method more appealing to respondents compared with the other? We sought to understand whether one of these methods was better than the other as way to increase respondent satisfaction (and thus future response rates) without a change in the end-result of the data. (more…)

Monday

28

October 2013

0

COMMENTS

Monday

28

October 2013

0

COMMENTS

Which variety of conjoint should I use?

Written by , Posted in Optimizing Insight, Research Methods

Conjoint analysis, one of the most effective tools for understanding buyer decision making, was first introduced in the early 1980’s in the form of a card sorting task. The typical task consisted of 18 or more physical cards, each bearing a product description that was constructed by combining features according to experimental design principles, and respondents sorted the cards in rank order from most preferred to least preferred. Monotonic analysis of variance (“MONANOVA”) was used to estimate “part-worths” for each of the features that made up the product concepts. Once the researcher had these part-worths in hand it was possible to simulate the choices consumers would make under different competitive market scenarios. (more…)